Super Death Arena Steam Pile Review

by | Jan 16, 2017

Super (I wish this were my) Death Arena

Super Death Arena is built on the bones of an unfinished early access game called Lifeless by the very same developer, Rigid-Soft. Not only is that game not finished, the developer stated in a recent update that “If Super Death Arena is successful we will be able to continue working on Lifeless as well.”

Fuck that! That is not how Early Access is meant to work. You don’t get to double dip with promises of finishing your previous title if your next one is successful. Easily one of the sleaziest things I’ve seen on Steam so far this year.

Worse yet, the game isn’t even good, polished, and dares to include microtransactions.

I’ll pause for laughter.

Super Death Arena
Steam Page
Developer: 
Rigid-Soft
Publisher: 
Rigid-Soft
Release: January 11, 2017
Price:
$8.99
Rig:
Intel i7-3930K @ 3.20GHz
32GB DDR3 RAM
EVGA GTX 980

 

So what is Super Death Arena other than water trash? Well, it is supposed to be a multiplayer wave based arena shooter, but you’d be hard pressed to find anyone to play with as the servers are empty. Unfortunately, you can play alone, but I wouldn’t suggest it. Or even playing the game at all.

Each wave you seemingly get a randomized weapon given to you which ranged from guns to nearly worthless melee weapons in my time with the game. You use these to kill braindead AI that rush you and attack with seemingly undodgeable moves. As health doesn’t appear to regenerate, you’ll be hard pressed to get past wave five before giving up.

Did I mention this game dares to offer loot boxes for sale for real money that unlock dull looking clothing? Because that is a thing. Hilariously, when you die your character is suddenly shown floating in the air in front of you naked with the map shown in front of them clearly showing where it isn’t even stitched together properly. So you don’t even get to see the outfits you have anyways.  On top of that a majority of the times I died I had to force the game to close, as nothing would happen otherwise.

If I wanted to play a game that is built on the bones of a dead game that offers loot boxes via microtransactions, I’d play Overwatch. Avoid this hot garbage like the plague.

[A copy of the game was provided by the developer or publisher for the purpose of this review.]

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